Thursday, January 24, 2013

Three Maxims of Life.....Part 2



This is the second part of my Disserambling (dragon word derived from dissertation and rambling) about the Three Maxims of Life.

I started with two propositions or thesis:
1. Happy thoughts were dragon shit.
2. All artists are depressive people.

After some kind insights and a lot of digesting I have changed my propositions.
1. Some artists are depressive people.
2. Happy thoughts are not enough for permanent effective results (better wording.)

Fact: We as individuals and our personal worlds -all those things surrounding us- are not just made of thoughts. Our writing is not only made of thoughts either. We are integral sensory beings. We think but we also feel, hear, see, taste and smell. Physical truth, both in writing and in life.

Exercise 1. Answer these questions. What was the most heart-breaking moment of your life (or one of them)? What was the happiest? What do you hate to eat? What's your favorite perfume? Your favorite song? What did you eat Thursday two weeks ago? Where were you on April 8, 2010? Where did I leave my keys?

Anyway, it is proved the memories we remember easier are those that involve emotions with senses -yeah, just like good writing. That's why I included the maxims and that's where my proposition of "Happy thoughts are not enough" come from.

Exercise 2. I was tore between asking you to think on a lemon and asking you think on vomit. I needed an example to trigger sensory memories with physical response.  Let's use the lemon. Look at your hand and visualize a green and yellow lemon there. It's fresh. It's cut in half and it's juicy. Smell it. Imagine your face expression the first time you tasted an acid lemon. Your mouth waters.

I am sure many of you have done this type of exercise before, even unintentionally. You think on something, bring memories of the sensory details and get a physical effect. A very tangible response on something that is really not there. You are imagining it. Therefore, the thought alone cannot make the trick if it doesn't involve sensory triggers.

Likewise, words don't draw me into a story if the writer doesn't give me thoughts, emotion and sensory prompts as well. The stories that involve all of this, are the stories that will not just make readers travel from their places into the location where the story takes place. Those stories are the ones that stay with the reader for a long time after he or she has put the book aside. They have an everlasting effect.

Same happens when happy thoughts are combined with sensory and emotional prompts. It works different in the brain. It is not denying the pain and repeat like parrots "I'm ok, I'm ok" when everything inside screams we are not. That's empty talk and doesn't get us any lasting result. On the contrary, if we have the thought "everything is going to be alright" and we remember our moments of greatest, deepest peace to such detail that we actually relive them again; if we strive (it's not easy, and worst when you're in your "dark moment") and do not quit until we have fully grasped that memory, that sensation, the physical welfare, the emotional peace, and we keep the "everything is going to be all right" thought, then, we may achieve something more effectively.

We will have an effect that stays with us long enough to help us face our "dark moment" with a clearer mind and a stronger spirit.

Conclusion: Happy thoughts are not enough, they are just part of the recipe. Like words are just part of a book and a person doesn't have to be an island in a sea of people. Referring to the video in my first post, the racer got his father's help in his moment of darkness, to help him finish the race. Writers have a wonderful supporting community at your service (IWSG).

If you keep in mind we are integral beings, and you involve EVERY part in the process, besides the happy thoughts; then, I assure you everything WILL be all right.

Thanks for your time!





16 comments:

  1. Well stated and thanks for not making me think about vomit. Life is both joyful and so very heart breaking. I choose not to be a depressed or sad person because I can (for some it is not a choice of will, I realize). I grew up seeing the effects of clinical depression --not good. But writing, like life, will reflect both if we're to make an impact with our words.

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    1. Hahaha, yes I thought it was not such a good idea. :) And I agree with you. Thanks for reading!

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  2. Involving all of the senses - must better at that now than when I began writing.
    As for your questions, I don't even remember what I had for dinner last night.
    And your keys are on your dresser.

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    1. Ironically, after writing this, I spent an hour sitting outside because I forgot to take the keys with me. :)

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  3. Interesting reflections. I find that I can remember bad times more vividly than good times. I think this is because in the bad times I'm immensely introspective and dwelling on the whys of the situation and every nuance of feeling that I have, while in the good times I'm so busy experiencing the moment and having fun that I don't have time to focus on them and file them with clarity into my memory banks. But give me the good over the bad any time--I'd prefer not to have the bad memories.

    Lee
    A Faraway View

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    1. That's right, sir. I prefer good memories too and I am not good at remembering them. Trying to change that now. Thanks for reading and for your comment. :)

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  4. Well, I see we've moved right ahead. Last time I visited we were into dragon shit; now we're onto lemons and vomit. I'll go for the vomit every time. It gets right down into the center of things: smell, revulsion (a lot of that) fiery throat and tons of morning regret.

    I went to college, so I once again have first hand experience with all of these sensory experiences. Thank you so much for the return to those days of wine and roses. :-) I'm sure I'll able to use this in the future. WAIT! I did use it already. I wrote a great vomit scene . . . well, I think it's great.

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    1. Hahaha. You see, milady, I am always trying to improve myself. :D Thanks for reading me!

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  5. As I sit here and think, I feel like I remember good and bad fairly equally, but only the examples of each that involved intense emotions one way or the other. I remember what I was doing on the days I experienced both the good and the bad.

    Also, now I want lemonade.

    Shannon at The Warrior Muse

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    1. I guess that's a balanced response. There was a time when I could only remember the bad. Now I try to put attention to the good so I remember them better.

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  6. No, I can't remember what I ate two Thursdays ago.

    Painful memories always stand out for me. I know I dwell on them more than I do the good memories.

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    1. Me too. The ultimate goal of all this is to rewire the brain. :)

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  7. i need to integrate this more! i picture the scene and write it, but i need to immerse myself in it with senses & emotion and write that!

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    1. Not easy, but it is worth trying. :)

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  8. Wow. Excellent post! You've definitely given me a lot to think about.

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